Soho

Cover of the book, Soho.

Written by:

Published by: Faber Faber

★★★★★
★★★★★

4.27, based on 233 reviews.

Goodreads says:

In this intimate and vital debut, Richard Scott creates an uncompromising portrait of love and gay shame. Examining how trauma becomes a part of the language we use, Scott takes us back to our roots: childhood incidents, the violence our scars betray, forgotten forebears and histories. The hungers of sexual encounters are underscored by the risks that threaten when we give ourselves to or accept another. But the poems celebrate joy and tenderness, too, as in a sequence re-imagining the love poetry of Verlaine.The collection crescendos to Scott's tour de force, 'Oh My Soho!', where a night stroll under the street lamps of Soho Square becomes a search for true lineage, a reclamation of stolen ancestors, hope for healing, and, above all, the finding of our truest selves.

Waterstones says:

'When the respectable Londoner wants to feel devilish, he goes to Soho', wrote Thomas Burke in 1915 - but these words could have been uttered at any point in Soho's colourful history. From humble beginnings, Soho developed into a fashionable centre for London's nobility in the eighteenth century. This same area was to become a poverty-stricken Victorian hub of cheap lodging houses, the Soho of the devastating cholera outbreak of 1854. A new focus on business and manufacturing transformed Soho in the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries. In the 1960s, Carnaby Street became the fashion and retail centre of the world. The nightclubs of Soho played host to the Teddies, Mods, Rockers, Punks and New Romantics of post-war British youth culture. Complete with illustrations evoking the life and times of Soho, this new history explores the people and places that brought the area to worldwide fame.


Rating breakdown

★★★★★
★★★★★
4.27 out of 5 stars (233 ratings)
5 48% (111 ratings)
4 37% (86 ratings)
3 11% (26 ratings)
2 3% (8 ratings)
1 1% (2 ratings)

About Richard Scott

Richard Scott grew up in London and studied at the Royal College of Music and at Goldsmiths College. After working as an opera singer and presenting The Opera Hour on Resonance FM, Richard went on to win the Wasafiri New Writing Prize and become a Jerwood/Arvon Poetry mentee, a member of the Aldeburgh 8 and an Open Spaces artist resident at Snape Maltings in Suffolk. His pamphlet Wound (Rialto) won the Michael Marks Poetry Award 2016 and his poem ‘crocodile’ won the 2017 Poetry London Compet...
[Read more about Richard Scott]


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